flip-a-card

Flip-a-Card: Nearing Version 1.0

June 06, 2020 - 2 min read

The project board for the first release of flip-a-card is looking pretty good. As of right now, the remaining work is:

  • Review the character upbringing cards
  • Review some of the existing cards, which should be pro forma
  • Review the rules PDF
  • Write a few extra cards for support

The guy doing editing for this is also putting a style guide together. I don’t think that will block more serious playtesting, but will be good to have.

Upbringing

The big weakness of my current upbringing cards is that they’re still a little disordered. Some talk about the character (good) while others imply a particular background (bad). I’ve gotten some feedback and suggestions on how to work on this, and I have my own ideas how to address those problems.

Publishing pole stars as a separate supplement

I don’t think that pole stars are a necessary part of flip-a-card. I think they are a useful and interesting tool, however. To keep flip-a-card’s modularity intact, I will extract the rules for pole star creation into a separate document, then publish that on itch.io and reference it.

There’s other ways to do character relationships, and I want to leave room for groups to choose those systems. But I will ship a game that gives you one idea out of the box.

Combat Pacing

Right now, character cards don’t say “you meet a challenge”. They say “generate a hit”. This was a very deliberate and very early design decision. It means, for example, you can say “create a progress clock with X ticks”, then mark off one tick per hit the characters generate.

You can still mix this with regular challenges. For example, the party fights an ogre with 4 ticks of harm. You can generate a hit to mark one tick, and then the ogre does something in response. This could mean threatening harm in return, or damaging something the PCs want to protect, or making progress toward a place the PCs don’t want it, or whatever.

Along the way, side effects of the fight can pose other challenges. The end result is that the players only need to generate 4 hits to get past the encounter successfully (whatever that means), but have 2-3 times that many opportunities for a complication.

Image source

flip-a-cardgame-design-diary