I’m finally getting off my ass and putting together “The Compleat Villain”. This will be a compilation of characters, locations, and rules for superhero gaming, based on material I’ve put together over the years. Here’s a few of the highlights.

I have to get my household moved by April 2, so I’ve been busy with that. But here and there, I’m making progress on Grand Adventure.

A thread about damage got me thinking about a few optional rules for Grand Adventure: Conditions (for nuanced tracking of injury) and Equipment.

I was sick for a few weeks in November, and have been busy around the Thanksgiving holiday. Looking back, I saw fewer posts than I’d liked. So here’s what I’ve been thinking about during that time, which is how Grand Adventure all ties together.

I posted quite a bit about Inept Sorcerers on G+, on this blog, and elsewhere. Normally I don’t get so chatty about projects I’m working on, but I wanted to do two things I hadn’t really done before: first, to actually design a game, and second, to tell other people what I did and how I did it.

I’ve had this conversation with a few people, and it seemed helpful to them. So I’m writing it up, in hopes that it’s helpful to others.

It’s easy to sit down, try to design something, and not have it go the way you planned. From this, you might conclude that you’re bad at design, that what you just did has no value, and that you should throw it away.

I’m going to argue that this is the wrong lesson to learn from failure, and the right lesson can be learned by knowing just a little about genetics.

I’m looking at a design for Grand Adventure that focuses around Action Cards (a modified version of Spell Cards from Inept Sorcerers), and two new rules I’m still fleshing out, called Spotlight and Discoveries.

I’m designing a few “campaign frames” for Inept Sorcerers, which provide the game with a more concrete tone and setting.

On the heels of Inept Sorcerers and It Was There, Honest!, I thought I’d take a shot at writing a general-purpose adventure roleplaying game, using the things that resonated most with readers of those games.

I decided to go with the five-rooms approach, to give the game some structure. Based on that, I broke down the five areas, wrote descriptions for each one, and wrote three questions that the AF should try to ask as the kids narrate.