In comments on a previous post, describing a sample world for Grand Adventure called Talispire, I was challenged to do something more than just another fantasy world with elves n’ dwarves. Here’s the start of one, a water-world called Pelaga.

This is another list of things I like about Talispire, the sample world for Grand Adventure. In the last post, I talked about playing with standard fantasy tropes. This time I want to talk more about social and identity issues that sit in the text, waiting to be explored - if you want.

Political posts don’t normally appear in this space. But almost everybody I know has expressed fear about a Donald Trump presidency. That fear separates itself into a series of questions about RPGs and similar hobbies. I want to answer those questions for myself, plus an additional and important one: “Why do we play role-playing games?”

I had this random idea for a short story, about a grizzled mercenary assigned to escort a young princess in a fantasy world.

Grand Adventure offers a structured storytelling experience through Challenges. Characters encounter a situation and must navigate it, and their actions burn down one or more points of endurance per action. Not everyone would like that much detail. Fortunately you’re not forced to use it.

I wrote up a sample world for Grand Adventure called Talispire. It’s supposed to be a Standard Fantasy Setting on the surface, but with more depth if you look closely. So what am I proud of about its design?

Recently my Tuesday Star Wars GM wrote an article about what bothers him when running Fate. I wanted to write a counter-point to some of his thoughts, not intended to bring anyone into the Fate fold specifically, but rather a way to think about running adversary NPCs.

Wishes have power. Especially if you are playing Inept Sorcerers. This is an early version of an add-on rule for that game, allowing players to create wishes that must come true, regardless of cost.

After working on the other Fusion AU documents, I started on a new one, focused on bio-punk, genetic engineering, and monsters of various sorts.

I like putting thought into the reasons why a setting must work a certain way. It’s good practice for a roleplaying game, where some player will ask "hey, can we do X?" and I need to have a better reason to say “no” than "it will wreck my plot".

So if you want to keep a Star Wars game running the way you think it ought, but don’t just want to stomp on a player’s ideas, try the following ideas.